Special Collections
LSU Libraries
spacer
Home / Online Catalog Site A-Z Help    
   

 

ALONZO SNYDER PAPERS

Mss. 655

Inventory

 

Compiled by

Matthew F. K. McDaniel

2004

 

Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections

Special Collections, Hill Memorial Library

Louisiana State University Libraries

Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University

 

 

 

Contents of inventory

 

 

Summary                                                                                                                                                                                 

Biographical/Historical Note                                           

Scope and Content Note                                    

List of Series and Subseries                                          

Index Terms                 

Container List

Appendix : “Inventory of “New Orleans Prices Current, Commercial Intelligencer, and Merchant’s Transcript” editions (1844-1861)”

 

                                   

 

 

Summary

 

 

Size                                         3,534 items and 6 manuscript volumes

 

Geographic                              Louisiana, Mississippi, Kentucky

Locations

 

Inclusive                                  1779-1887, 1919, n.d.

Dates

 

Bulk Dates                               1800-1861

 

Languages                               English, French, Spanish

 

Summary                                 Personal, professional, and business papers of Alonzo Snyder, cotton planter, lawyer, judge, and Louisiana senator, of Madison and Tensas parishes, Louisiana.  Collection consists primarily of  records pertaining to Snyder’s legal career.  Collection also contains personal correspondence and financial records, correspondence related to Snyder’s political career, records of the management of the Snyder plantation, and papers of the Bieller family, of Concordia and Catahoula parishes, La. 

 

Copyright                                 Physical rights are retained by the LSU Libraries. Copyright is retained by descendants of creators in accordance with U. S. copyright law.

 

Citation                                    Alonzo Snyder Papers, Mss. 655, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

 

Stack location                          66-70, J:7, OS:S

 

Biographical/Historical Note

 

Alonzo Snyder was a cotton planter, lawyer, judge, and state senator of Madison and Tensas parishes, Louisiana.  Snyder’s legal practice focused on financial and real estate transactions, particularly the collection of defaulted accounts.  Alonzo Snyder married Celia Groves in 1847, but she passed away in November 1848. Snyder married Clara King about 1852; following this marriage, Snyder began calling his plantation at Bieller’s Landing in Tensas Parish “Villa Clara.” Snyder’s immediate family included his sister, Maria Boulden (d. 1859), of Rodney, Miss., and his brother or brother-in-law, Levi C. Harris, of Rodney and then Clinton, Miss.  Alonzo Snyder served frequently as a district judge and in the Louisiana Senate; he served as a delegate to that state’s secession convention in 1861. As a judge and an attorney, Snyder traveled extensively throughout the Mississippi delta region and maintained clients in both Louisiana and Mississippi. 

 

A significant portion of the collection relates to Jacob Bieller (c. 1770-1843) and his family of Concordia and Catahoula parishes, La.  Jacob Bieller, a native of the Newberry District of South Carolina, moved his family from the Charleston, S.C., vicinity to Concordia Parish, La., about 1809.  The Bieller family acquired and operated plantations in Catahoula, Tensas, and Franklin parishes. Jacob Bieller’s son and daughter-in-law, Joseph and Peggy Bieller, managed Bayou Macon plantation in Catahoula Parish, La.  Upon the death of Joseph and Peggy Bieller in 1835, their children became the wards of Jacob Bieller. 

 

Jacob Bieller’s marital life was complicated and led to significant legal proceedings upon his own death in 1843.  He was married to his first wife, Mary Nueffer, in South Carolina in 1790 and had the marriage annulled in Georgia as South Carolina law prohibited divorce under any circumstances.  Joseph Bieller appears to have been the sole surviving child of this marriage.  Jacob Bieller married Nancy Lester in South Carolina, and the couple produced one child after moving to Louisiana, Elizabeth Lester Bieller (1819-1852).  When Elizabeth Bieller eloped in 1834 and married Felix Bosworth (1809-1847), first judge of Carroll Parish, against her father’s wishes, Jacob Bieller disinherited her; soon after, Nancy Bieller charged Jacob Bieller with adultery and violence against her, fled to the Bosworth household, and began legal proceedings to recover property from her estranged husband.  Felix Bosworth was apparently shot on the Bieller plantation in 1843 and lost a hand.

 

Upon Jacob Bieller’s death, both Elizabeth Bieller Bosworth and the children of Joseph Bieller brought suit claiming to be the lawful heirs of Jacob Bieller.  As the only surviving child of Jacob Bieller, Elizabeth Bosworth claimed to be the sole rightful heir; the grandchildren of Jacob Bieller claimed to be the rightful heirs as the intended recipients in Jacob Bieller’s will and further asserted that his marriage to Nancy Bieller was illegal.

 

 

Scope and Content Note

 

Business, official, and personal papers of Alonzo Snyder, attorney, judge, cotton planter, and Louisiana senator, from Madison and Tensas Parishes, consisting principally of letters, land records, case files, bills, receipts, and record books pertaining to his legal practice, plantation management, local and state politics, and various family matters. 

 

The earliest portion of the collection consists of documents concerning Jacob Bieller (c. 1770 - 1843), a native of South Carolina and cotton planter of Concordia Parish, and his family.  These documents may have been used by Alonzo Snyder in the settlement of the Bieller estate, although some documents in the collection suggest Snyder may have purchased a portion of the Bieller estate himself.  Correspondence between Jacob Bieller and his son, Joseph, a planter of Catahoula Parish, provides details of family life, the educational progress of Joseph’s children, and the management of the Bayou Macon plantation.  Letters, primarily addressed from Joseph to his father Jacob, mention the productivity of livestock and crops, and describe the health, medical treatment, and physical punishment of slaves.  The Bieller papers include additional items and correspondence related to Jacob Bieller’s personal legal matters, finances, and the management of his own plantation.  Legal papers detail Jacob Bieller’s acquisition of property, his estate, and his complex marital life, including various legal proceedings related to his daughter Elizabeth’s elopement.

 

Personal correspondence to Alonzo Snyder from family and friends reflects typical concerns, such as health of family and acquaintances, the education of children, and the productivity of farms and plantations.  Additional personal papers include financial documents and correspondence related to the purchase and transport of personal and household goods, Snyder’s personal accounts with merchants, and his personal debt and lending.

 

The bulk of this collection comprises correspondence, case files, and assorted official documents related to Snyder’s legal career.  As both attorney and judge, Snyder received frequent legal correspondence, and these letters generally concerned some form of unmet financial obligation, such as defaulted mortgages and loans and unpaid accounts.  Correspondence from clients includes both creditors and defaulters. These legal papers also include various official documents and records, such as court orders, petitions, and depositions related to Snyder’s caseload.

 

Additional correspondence and documents address the management of Alonzo Snyder’s plantation and his purchase of slaves.  The bulk of the plantation correspondence contains letters from New Orleans factorage houses and commission merchants; this correspondence relates market conditions, the transport and sale of Snyder’s cotton, and Snyder’s purchase of plantation goods, such as cotton gin machinery, large quantities of groceries and clothing, and various implements and hardware.

 

Political correspondence relates to Snyder’s election to the bench and later the Louisiana State Senate. Letters generally address matters of local concern in Snyder’s district, such as levee laws and local political boundaries.

 

A small portion of correspondence to Alonzo Snyder briefly addresses secession and the Civil War (see container list for locations).


 

 

List of Subgroups, Series, and Subseries

 

Subgroup 1. Jacob Bieller Family Papers, 1779-1853, n.d.

Series I. Personal papers, 1779-1853, n.d.

Subseries 1. Correspondence, 1807-1841, n.d.

Subseries 2. Legal papers, 1779-1853, n.d.

Subseries 3. Financial papers, 1823-1852, n.d.

Subseries 4. Miscellaneous, 1823, n.d.

 

Series II. Legal career, 1801-1840

Subseries 1. Correspondence and memorandums, 1833-1840

Subseries 2. Case files and official documents, 1801-1835

 

Series III. Plantation management, 1786-1852, n.d.

Subseries 1. Correspondence and memorandums, 1810-1852, n.d.

Subseries 2. Financial papers, 1786-1850, n.d.

 

Subgroup 2. Alonzo Snyder Papers, 1838-1919, n.d.

Series I. Personal papers, 1839-1919, n.d.

Subseries 1. Correspondence, 1839-1861, 1866-1867, 1887, n.d.

Subseries 2. Financial papers, 1839-1861, n.d.

            Subseries 3. Miscellaneous, 1845, 1847, 1858, 1869-1872, 1919, n.d.

 

Series II. Legal career, 1838-1861, n.d.

Subseries 1. Correspondence, 1839-1861, n.d.

Subseries 2. Case files and official documents, 1839-1857, n.d.

Subseries 3. Memorandums and notes, 1838-1861, n.d.

 

Series III. Plantation management, 1841-1861, n.d.

Subseries 1. Correspondence and memorandums, 1843-1861, n.d.

Subseries 2. Financial papers, 1841-1861, n.d.

 

Series IV. Political papers, 1842-1861

 

Series V. Manuscript volumes, 1842-1853

 

 

 

 

Subgroups, Series, and Subseries Descriptions

 

Subgroup 1. Jacob Bieller Family Papers

 

Series I. Personal papers

 

                         Subseries 1. Correspondence 1807-1841, n.d.

 

Correspondence between Jacob Bieller and his son, Joseph, frequently addresses Joseph Bieller’s family life and management of Bayou Macon plantation in Catahoula Parish.  Letters relate family matters such as the proposed education of Jacob Bieller’s grandchildren and his responsibility of providing for them following the deaths of Joseph and his wife, Peggy, from yellow fever. 

 

Later correspondence concerns Jacob Bieller’s daughter Elizabeth’s elopement with Felix Bosworth and Elizabeth’s subsequent disinheritance by her father.  Correspondence between Jacob Bieller and his daughter, his estranged wife Nancy, and his son-in-law Felix Bosworth relate the strained nature of negotiations regarding the disposition of property following the elopement.

 

                            Subseries 2. Legal papers 1779-1853, n.d.

 

Legal papers relate to Jacob Bieller’s real estate acquisitions, personal property, and evolving and disputed marital situation. A significant number of documents relates to the inventory and disposition of Bieller’s estate (such as his plantations China Grove and Mound Bayou), the disinheritance of his daughter, Elizabeth, for her 1834 elopement with Felix Bosworth, and the legal challenge pressed by the disinherited couple upon Bieller’s death.  This subseries includes 1834 wills of Jacob Bieller explicitly disinheriting Elizabeth Bieller Bosworth and manumitting some of his slaves, copies of several 1843 inventories of his estate, and various printed matter related to the lawsuits pressed following Jacob Bieller’s death.

 

The earliest papers include a 1779 will of Jacob Bieller’s father, Joseph, as well as an 1803 document granting Jacob and Mary Bieller a divorce in Georgia.  An 1808 document signed by South Carolina Governor Charles Pinckney certifies Jacob Bieller’s citizenship in that state and provides his introduction to the governors of Georgia and Louisiana (located separately with oversize documents; see container list).  Various legal documents, including deeds, patents, and plats, relate to Jacob Bieller’s purchase of real estate in Louisiana and the assembly of his primary plantation at the Petit Gulf on the Mississippi River. 

 

Additional oversize items include: a June 2, 1804 will of Jacob Bieller prepared in South Carolina; an April 3, 1811 document, variously signed by government officials, including David Holmes, Governor of the Mississippi Territory, regarding transferal of a tract of land in Concordia Parish, La., possibly to Jacob Bieller; and a February 26, 1818 indenture by which Jacob Bieller purchased land on the Mississippi River in Concordia Parish, La., from Elijah and Mary Smith and David and Ann Hunt of the state of Mississippi (see container list).

 

Later documents include items related to a suit by the Branch of the Carrollton Bank in Lake Providence, La., against Felix Bosworth and also a suit against the same bank in which Bosworth was a witness.

 

                         Subseries 3. Financial papers 1823-1852, n.d.

 

Various financial papers relate to household maintenance and include receipts, statements of account, and shipping receipts for the purchase of household necessities such as clothing, groceries, and hardware. Assorted documents also concern Jacob Bieller’s personal debts and lending.  Similar items after 1849 primarily concern Thomas C. Bieller.

 

                               Subseries 4. Miscellaneous 1823, n.d.

 

Subseries contains various notes, lists, and memorandums not related to the above series.

 

Series II. Legal career

 

             Subseries 1. Correspondence and memorandums 1833-1840

 

Primarily contains memoranda related to the prosecution of elapsed debts that date to the period in which Jacob Bieller may have practiced law in Louisiana.

 

                Subseries 2. Case files and official documents 1801-1835

 

Subseries contains several 1801 case memorandums signed by Jacob Bieller as a Justice of the Peace for Newberry District, S.C., and a broadside showing Jacob Bieller’s inclusion in South Carolina’s 1806 House of Representatives. 

 

Series also includes documents related to his possible practice of law following his relocation to Louisiana, such as various land patents, claims, and plats apparently unrelated to his personal purchase of real estate.

 

 

Series III. Plantation management

 

         Subseries 1. Correspondence and memorandums 1810-1852, n.d.

 

Various correspondence and documents related to the management of the Bieller family’s plantation holdings.  Assorted letters to Jacob Bieller from acquaintances relate regional plantation conditions, such as the health of slaves and crop production. Two letters written to Samuel Ford by Bieller indicate conditions on Bieller’s own plantation. Correspondence in 1835 between Bieller and Jesse L. Ward, overseer of Bayou Macon plantation, concerns management of that estate following the death of Bieller’s son, Joseph.  An 1834 contract between Jacob Bieller and Garrett P. Rawlings employs Rawlings as overseer of Bieller’s plantation.  An 1824 proposal lists basic materials necessary to construct a cotton gin.  An 1810 memo recounts his exchange of slaves to purchase a small Concordia parish plantation; the subseries also included lists of slaves and their children.

 

Correspondence with cotton factors Alvarez Fisk in Natchez, Miss., and W. Bogart in New Orleans, as well as several letters or drafts of letters written to Fisk by Jacob Bieller, relate the inventory, transport, and sale of Bieller’s cotton crop.  October 7 and November 4, 1826 editions of the handbill New Orleans Wholesale Prices Current report market activity in that city.  An 1835 printed form-letter from New Orleans factors Burke, Watt and Co. outlines that firms concerns regarding the depressed cotton market and uncertain diplomatic relations with France, and urges American planters to reconsider withholding cotton crops and transport them to Europe.

 

                         Subseries 2. Financial papers 1786-1850, n.d.

 

Various financial documents relate to the management of the Bieller family’s plantation holdings.  Several receipts indicate the purchase, sale, and trade of slaves. Receipts also detail the inventory, transport, and sale of cotton, including receipts for bagging and cordage to prepare bales for market. 

 

Series also includes various statements of account and receipts for goods, tools, and services purchased.  Examples of plantation goods acquired include: bulk purchases of groceries, such as mess pork, flour, and lard; bulk purchases of medicines, such as quinine and calomel; and bulk purchases of tools and hardware, such as ploughs, “cane knives,” cotton gin apparatus, and a grindstone.

 

Subgroup 2. Alonzo Snyder Papers

 

Series I. Personal papers

 

              Subseries 1. Correspondence 1839-1861, 1866-67, 1887, n.d.

 

Correspondence includes personal letters received by Alonzo Snyder from family, friends, and colleagues.  Regular correspondents include Snyder’s sister, Maria Boulden of Rodney, Miss., his fiance and wife, Clara King Snyder, his brother or brother-in-law Levi C. Harris, and his professional partner and friend, D. S. Stacy (d. 1857). 

 

Letters pertain to a variety of issues, including the health of family and friends, the outbreak of diseases such as cholera and yellow fever in the vicinity; the secondary and college education of family members, and various news and happenings related to family and friends. Correspondence from Levi C. Harris generally relates to agricultural conditions and production on his property and the health of his own family. Letters from Maria Boulden relate various news and incidents and regularly urge a visit from Snyder.  Correspondence from Harris and Boulden indicate that Alonzo Snyder handled their regular legal affairs.  The discussion of borrowing slaves or sending them to various properties was frequent between family correspondents.  Various letters from merchants report on the progress of acquiring ordered goods and their subsequent transportation to Snyder’s estate.

 

Of note are letters relating: a July 13, 1844 duel between acquaintances; Snyder’s purchase of a artificial wooden eye in 1845; betting on horseracing in 1846; the return of Snyder’s miniature portrait by former romantic interest “Mat” in 1846; an 1847 letter concerning the Mexican War; construction of a new home for Snyder in 1848; an 1850 letter concerning the Lopez Expedition to Cuba; and the imminence of secession prior to the outbreak of the Civil War.  Letters written to Alonzo Snyder and containing specific references to secession include: three items from J. C. King (September 6, and November 1 and 13, 1861); and three items from Hebrard and Co. (September 9 and 10, and October 3, 1861).

 

Later items include three letters dated between September, 1866 and April, 1867 written to G. Nulley from T. Wilbur Compton relating a pending suit against the Stacy estate, the health of Compton’s daughters, and flooding at Botany Bay plantation, La.  An 1887 letter from attorney James G. Leach of Natchez, Miss., to Mrs. E. S. Compton of Vicksburg, Miss., regards the title to a lot in Natchez.

 

                         Subseries 2. Financial papers 1839-1861, n.d.

 

Various financial documents relate the management of the Snyder household, including bills and receipts for goods and services purchased, bills of lading for shipment of such goods via steamboats, and statements of various credit accounts.  Typical goods purchased included various groceries, clothing, fabrics, and hardware; typical services engaged included medicinal and carpentry. Assorted correspondence relates to Alonzo Snyder’s personal lending, personal debts, and exchange of negotiable paper.  Of note are account statements issued immediately prior to the Civil War, in which merchants “call in” accounts and refuse to extend credit due to political and economic uncertainty.

           

                     Subseries 3. Miscellaneous 1845, 1847, 1858, 1869-1872, 1919, n.d.

 

Miscellaneous items include: a deed for Alonzo Snyder’s purchase of a plantation at a sheriff’s sale; an 1858 University of Louisiana diploma; grade reports from Centenary College, La., and Clifton Preparatory School, Va.; 1864 Confederate currency printed in Richmond, Va.; a 1919 broadside in which President Woodrow Wilson urges passage of the Federal suffrage amendment; and two undated poems or songs.

 

Series II. Legal career

           

Subseries 1. Correspondence 1839-1861, n.d.

 

Correspondence relates to Alonzo Snyder’s legal practice in Tensas Parish, La., and the surrounding region, including areas in Mississippi.  Snyder’s practice focused on financial and real estate transactions, particularly the collection of defaulted personal and bank loans and accounts, and disputed successions of estates.  The bulk of the correspondence reflects Snyder’s interaction with creditors, defaulters, and colleagues during efforts to collect or settle outstanding financial obligations.  As slaves were property, often purchased on credit, and used as collateral or payment, cases involving such transactions appear intermittently in Snyder’s legal correspondence.

 

Additional correspondence relates to 1853-1854 legal proceedings for the commitment of a juvenile female to a state insane asylum, and 1850-1852 correspondence from colleague Isaac Thomas relating travel to and conditions in San Francisco, Cal., early judicial proceedings there, and his personal desire to introduce slavery there.

 

Note that, as many of Alonzo Snyder’s legal correspondents were acquaintances, letters in this series incorporate items of personal interest, such as the imminence of secession and outbreak of the Civil War. Letters written to Alonzo Snyder and containing specific references to secession and the Civil War include: three items from James G. Leach (February 2, March 5, and April 23, 1861); one item from Rotchford, Brown and Co. (April 17, 1861); one item from Henrietta Anns (April 22, 1861); and two items from H. B. Shaw (September 14 and October 23, 1861).

 

Frequent correspondents in this subseries include: John A Gibson, Hinds County, Miss.; William Cannon, Natchez, Miss.; W. L. Poindexter, Vidalia, La.; William E. Butler, Jackson, Tenn.; Joseph E. Jones, Vicksburg, Miss.; Hance C. Hamilton, Natchez, Miss., and Concordia Parish, La.; William B. Minor, Warren County, Miss., and Madison Parish, La.; James R. Bisland, Catahoula Parish, La.; John H. Overton, Madison and St. Landry parishes, La.; Haller C. Nutt, Tensas Parish, La., and Natchez, Miss.; James Dunlap, New Orleans, La.; William P. Briscoe, Natchez, Miss.; and William B. Taylor, Danville, Ky.

 

 

            Subseries 2. Case files and official documents 1839-1857, n.d.

 

A variety of official documents and evidence relate to the administration and progression of Alonzo Snyder’s caseload in both Louisiana and Mississippi.  Bulk of documents relate to the collection of financial obligations and the administering of successions.  Examples of official or notarized documents possibly entered as evidence in court by Snyder include but are not limited to: deeds and mortgages for both land and slaves; sworn depositions and transcriptions of interrogations; plats and descriptions of real property; appraisals of personal estates; articles of agreement between business partners; copies of account statements and promissory notes; various power of attorney documents; and documents related to the transfer or sale of financial claims.  Of particular note is a July 23,1850 copy of a receipt given by a former owner to a former female slave who had purchased her freedom.

 

Examples of documents issued by or related to proceedings of courts include but are not limited to: court summons; notices of court judgments and orders; copies of recorded judgments; citations to comply with plaintiff’s petitions; answers to aforementioned petitions; copies of recorded case histories; writs of attachment to seize and hold property; writs of sequestration to seize portions of property to satisfy financial obligations; notices of seizure of property by parish sheriffs or deputies; writs of injunction to stop sheriff sales of seized property; deeds and other documents related to seizure and sheriff sales of property; appointments of curators of successions; documents related to the partition of estates; letters of guardianship (custody of minors); letters of agreement or compromise between litigants; various documents related to appeals of judgments; and lists of court costs.

 

Oversize items housed separately include: an April 11, 1843 instrument of protest prepared in New Orleans for Elizabeth Noulen regarding the failure of Ringgold, Ferriday and Company to honor a bank draft in her possession; a March 2, 1846 petition filed by John T. Mason regarding the improper sale of property to which he was entitled by the probate court of Madison Parish; an April 10, 1851 petition filed by J. W. Arthur and Company, a commercial trading partnership of New Orleans, asserting that the partnership was the rightful owner of a promissory note paid to William Kelly and Volney B. Perry; a group of documents, formerly bound and dating between 1837 and 1855, relating to the lawsuit of George Overaker versus B. M. Stedman, in which judgment favored the plaintiff and was levied upon Green T. Martin’s real estate holdings in Concordia Parish, La.; and a July 23, 1856 court document and copy of a May 15, 1856 judicial decree regarding Alexander C. Ferguson acting as receiver in the lawsuit of John Bacon, et al., versus William Robertson, et al., and his filing a bond with the court of the Southern District of Mississippi to act as such (see container list).

 

                  Subseries 3. Memorandums and notes 1838-1861, n.d.

 

Subseries contains various memorandums, unofficial documents, notes, and lists related to Alonzo Snyder’s caseload and the business affairs of his legal practice.  A significant portion of this subseries contains documents, such as receipts, bills, and account statements, related to the business partnership of Charles Baldwin and Lafayette Jones, who operated a general store and tavern in Richmond, La. Baldwin and Jones may have been clients of Alonzo Snyder, and these documents may have constituted a legal file. Documents related to the Baldwin and Jones partnership in this subseries are maintained separately; subseries also contains two small manuscript volumes, including a notebook (1834-1839, marked as volume 4) of John W. Minor and an office docket (1849-1852, marked as volume 1) of Alonzo Snyder (see container list). 

 

Series III. Plantation management

 

         Subseries 1. Correspondence and memorandums 1843-1861, n.d.

 

Bulk of correspondence addressed to Alonzo Snyder from New Orleans factorage houses and commission merchants with whom Snyder regularly conducted business, including Burke, Watt and Co., Bogart and Foley, Buckner and Stanton, and Rotchford, Brown, and Co.  This correspondence generally relates to the transportation and sale of cotton and the fulfillment of orders for various household and plantation commodities placed by Snyder on his credit account. Factors regularly report on the volatile cotton market both in New Orleans and Europe.  Correspondents from the aforementioned factorage houses regularly attached editions of the New Orleans Prices Current, Commercial Intelligencer and Merchants’ Transcript, a multi-weekly handbill reporting various domestic and international market activity (see inventory following container list).

 

The earliest documents related to Alonzo Snyder’s brother or brother-in-law Levi C. Harris’s interest in a plantation partnership in Louisiana; related documents discuss plans to grow cotton and raise cattle as well as basic plantation management. 

 

Additional correspondence to Alonzo Snyder relates to general plantation management, including the purchase, transfer, and management of slaves, the procurement of plantation commodities such as groceries, clothing, and hardware, and conditions of and instructions regarding agricultural production.  A series of 1859 letters from A. B. Reading of the Vicksburg  Foundry relate Snyder’s purchase of a new steam engine to power his plantation’s cotton gin. 

 

Additional items include several printed solicitations to Snyder from factorage houses and merchants selling plantation wares, including an 1859 letter listing types and prices of “negro clothing” produced at Pearl River Mills in Jackson, Miss.  Other items of note include: an 1847 letter written from Bardstown, Ky., reporting the “names, ages, and height of you girl Charlotte’s children,” slaves, as well as notes regarding their complexion and monetary value; an 1853 letter regarding the measurement of a recently constructed local levee; an 1855 letter regarding the purchase of a large quantity of “Bannana cotton seed” and directions for planting it; an 1859 response to Snyder’s reporting a recently purchased slave girl “unsound,” and the slave trader’s directions for returning and replacing her; an 1859 solicitation from an overseer to work Snyder’s plantation; an 1859 letter regarding Snyder’s order of a large quantity of mess pork from a St. Louis, Mo. merchant, including a contemporary edition of the “Merchants’ Exchange Reporter & Price Current” for that city; and an 1861 letter regarding the shipment of two “distinct” types of sugar cane seed, along with directions for their planting and cultivation. 

           

Subseries 2. Financial Papers 1841-1861, n.d.

 

Documents include inventories of baled cotton and individual bale weights, as well as various receipts for shipment of cotton to New Orleans, reception by factorage houses there, and subsequent sales. Additional documents and receipts relate to Snyder’s purchase of household and plantation commodities through New Orleans factorage houses and commission merchants.  Groceries regularly ordered or purchased in quantity include mess pork and beef, bacon, molasses, flour, corn, and coffee, as well as “plantation medicines.” Additional items regularly purchased include bagging, rope, and twine for cotton baling, clothing for slaves, ploughs, and various agricultural tools and machine hardware.

 

This subseries also includes numerous New Orleans Price Currents, Commercial Intelligencer & Merchants’ Transcript (see inventory following container list).  Other items of note include bills of overseers, a detailed 1846 bill from a blacksmith, an 1856 insurance policy on Snyder’s “Gin House, stand, Press, Gearing & Grist Mill,” and an 1858 estimate and 1860 bill for a new engine and shafting for Snyder’s cotton gin.

 

 

 

 

            Series IV. Political Papers 1842-1861

 

Correspondence relates to Alonzo Snyder’s tenure in the Louisiana Senate and issues relevant to his senate district, such as the maintenance of river levees, the dispute over changing the Carroll and Franklin parish boundary lines, and legislation to protect timber on private property from theft.  An 1852 letter from Governor Robert Wickliffe concerns a convention bill, and various correspondence relates political party disputes, as well as regional and national elections.

 

Series V. Manuscript Volumes 1842-1853

 

Manuscript volumes include a ledger (1842-1847) belonging to Alonzo Snyder, a daybook of Samuel R. Ford (1842-1849), a record book for Buena Vista plantation (1843-1853), and a record book containing prescriptions (1848-1853).

 

 

INDEX TERMS

(Materials relating to the person, places, or things listed can be found in the subgroup, series, and subseries indicated by their numbers thereunder.

 

Bieller, Jacob (d. 1843)

            Subgroup 1

 

Bieller, Joseph

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III : Subseries 1

 

Bieller, Nancy Lester

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1, 2, 3

 

Bosworth, Elizabeth Bieller

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1, 2

 

Bosworth, Felix

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1, 2

 

Boulden, Maria

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

 

Harris, Levi C.

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

 

Snyder, Clara King

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

 

Stacy, D. S. (d. 1857)

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1

 

Thomas, Isaac (1774-1859)

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1

 

Wickliffe, Robert Charles, 1820-1895

            Subgroup 2 : Series IV

 

Agriculture—Louisiana—19th century

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Cholera—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1

 

Commission merchants—Mississippi—Natchez

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Commission merchants—Louisiana—New Orleans

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

           

Cotton growing—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1: Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Cotton trade—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Divorce—Louisiana—19th century

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1, 2

 

Education—Louisiana—19th century

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1, 3

 

Family problems

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1, 2

 

Inheritance and succession—Louisiana—19th century

Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1, 2

Subgroup 2 : Series II

 

Levees—Louisiana

            Subgroup 2 : Series IV

 

Marital conflict—Louisiana—19th century

            Subgroup 1 : Series 1 : Subseries 1, 2

 

Plantations—Mississippi

            Subgroup 2 : Series II

 

Plantations—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series II

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series V

 

Practice of Law—Louisiana—19th century

            Subgroup 1 : Series II

            Subgroup 2 : Series II

 

Secession—Southern States

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1

 

Slavery—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1, 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Slavery—Mississippi

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1, 2

 

Slaves—Emancipation

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 2

 

Slaves—Medical care

            Subgroup 1 : Series III : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series III : Subseries 1

           

Slaves—Social conditions

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Suffrage—United States

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 3

 

Timber—Louisiana

            Subgroup 2 : Series IV  

 

Yellow fever—Louisiana

Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1

 

Bayou Macon Plantation (La.)

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

 

China Grove Plantation (La.)

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 2

 

Cuba—History—Insurrection, 1849-1851

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

 

Louisiana—Social life and customs—19th century

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

 

Louisiana—Politics and government—1803-1865

            Subgroup 2 : Series IV

 

Madison Parish—History—19th century

            Subgroup 2

 

Mound Bayou Plantation (La.)

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 2

 

Tensas Parish—History—19th century

            Subgroup 1, 2

 

Villa Clara Plantation (La.)

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

Invoices

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 3

            Subgroup 1 : Series III : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series III : Subseries 2

 

Letters (correspondence)

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series II : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 1 : Series III : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series III : Subseries 1

            Subgroup 2 : Series IV

 

Receipts (acknowledgements)

            Subgroup 1 : Series I : Subseries 3

            Subgroup 1 : Series III : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series I : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series III : Subseries 2

 

Slave bills of sale

            Subgroup 1 : Series III : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series II : Subseries 2

            Subgroup 2 : Series III : Subseries 2

 

Judges—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series II

            Subgroup 2 : Series II

 

Lawyers—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series II

            Subgroup 2 : Series II

 

Plantation owners—Louisiana

            Subgroup 1 : Series III

            Subgroup 2 : Series II

            Subgroup 2 : Series III

 

 


 

CONTAINER LIST

 

Stack location

Box

Folders

Contents

 

 

 

Subgroup 1.  Jacob Bieller Family Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series I. Personal papers

R:38

1

1 – 9

Correspondence (1807-1841, n.d.)

 

 

10 – 19

Legal papers (1779-1853, n.d.)

 

 

 

 

OS:S

1

1

-- 1808 document signed by S.C. Gov. Charles Pinckney

 

 

2

-- June 2, 1804 Jacob Bieller will

 

 

3

-- April 3, 1811 transferal of property

 

 

4

-- February 26, 1818 indenture

 

 

 

 

R:38

2

1 – 2

Financial papers (1823-1852, n.d.)

 

 

3

Miscellaneous (1823, n.d.)         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series II. Legal career

R:38

2

4

Correspondence, etc. (1833-1840)

 

 

5 – 7

Case files, etc. (1801-1835)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series III. Plantation management

R:38

2

8 – 13

Correspondence, etc. (1810-1852, n.d.)

 

 

14 – 16

Financial papers (1786-1850, n.d.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subgroup 2. Alonzo Snyder Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series I. Personal papers

R:38

3

1 – 19

Correspondence (1839-1861, 1866-1867, 1887, n.d.)

 

 

20 – 29

Financial papers (1839-1861, n.d.)

 

 

30

Miscellaneous (1847, 1858, 1869-1872, n.d.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series II. Legal career

R:38

4

1 – 26

Correspondence (1839-1845)

 

 

 

 

R:39

5

1 – 27

Correspondence (1846- May, 1849)

 

 

 

 

R:39

6

1 – 26

Correspondence (June, 1849-1851)

 

 

 

 

R:39

7

1 – 37

Correspondence (1852-1859)

 

 

 

 

R:39

8

1 – 19

Correspondence (1860-1861, n.d.)

 

 

20 – 33

Case files, etc. (1839-1847)

 

 

 

 

OS:S

1

5

-- April 11, 1843 Noulen instrument of protest

 

 

6

-- March 2, 1846 Mason petition

 

 

 

 

R:40

9

1 – 23

Case files, etc. (1848-1857, n.d.)

 

 

 

 

OS:S

1

7

-- April 10, 1851 Arthur petition

 

 

8

-- 1855 Overaker vs. Stedman documents

 

 

9

-- 1856 Bacon, et al., vs. Robertson, et al., documents

 

 

 

 

R:40

9

24 – 28

Memorandums, etc. (Baldwin and Jones partnership papers only, 1838-1842)

 

 

 

 

R:40

10

1 – 27

Memorandums, etc. (1838-1861, n.d.)

 

 

20

John W. Minor notebook, 1834-1839 (marked as Vol. 4)

 

 

21

Alonzo Snyder office docket, 1849-1852 (Vol. 1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series III. Plantation management

R:40

10

28 – 35

Correspondence, etc. (1835-1852)

 

 

 

 

R:40

11

1 – 28

Correspondence, etc. (1853-1861, n.d.)

 

 

29 – 36

Financial papers (1841-1861, n.d.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R:40

11

37 – 45

Series IV. Political career (1842-1861)

 

OS:S

1

9

--[1861] Petition of citizens of Carroll Parish for Legislature to build levee, includes map.

 

 

 

 

Series V. Manuscript volumes

J:7

 

 

Alonzo Snyder ledger, 1842-1847 (marked as Vol. 3)

 

 

 

Samuel R. Ford daybook, 1842-1849 (Vol. 2)

 

 

 

Buena Vista Plantation record book, 1843-1853 (Vol. 5)

 

 

 

Record book, 1848-1853 (Vol. 6)

 

 


Appendix :   “Inventory of “New Orleans Prices Current, Commercial Intelligencer, and Merchant’s Transcript” editions (1844-1861)”

 

Note:    All items located in Subgroup 2 (Alonzo Snyder Papers), Series III (Plantation management), Subseries 1 (Correspondence), except those marked with an asterisk, which are located in Subgroup 2, Series III, Subseries 2 (Financial papers).  Items followed by the letter “d.” are in poor condition or damaged and may contain incomplete information.

 


4/19/44 d.

 

12/6/1845

12/17/1845

 

1/2/1847

1/6/1847

5/15/1847

10/20/1847

10/27/1847

11/10/1847

11/13/1847

12/4/1847

12/18/1847

 

1/1/1848

1/15/1848

1/19/1848

3/18/1848

3/29/1848

4/1/1848

4/8/1848

4/22/1848

6/24/1848

7/15/1848

7/22/1848

10/14/1848

12/20/1848

 

3/19/1853

4/30/1853

5/28/1853

7/16/1853

7/30/1853

8/13/1853

9/24/1853

10/1/1853

11/12/1853

11/19/1853

12/10/1853

12/17/1853

12/31/1853 d.

 

1/7/1854 d.

1/21/1854 d.

1/28/1854 d.

2/25/1854 d.

3/11/1854 d.

4/15/1854 d.

4/29/1854 d.

7/29/1854 d.

8/5/1854 d.

9/1/1854 (Annual Statement) d.

11/24/1854 d.

12/3/1854 d.

12/9/1854 d.

 

1/6/1855

1/13/1855

2/10/1855

4/7/1855

6/16/1855*

8/25/1855

11/24/1855

12/15/1855*

 

3/1/1856

3/8/1856

3/15/1856*

5/10/1856*

5/17/1856

6/14/1856*

6/21/1856

6/28/1856

9/27/1856

10/4/1856*

10/8/1856*

11/22/1856*

12/6/1856*

 

1/7/1857

1/10/1857

4/4/1857

5/6/1857

5/16/1857

6/27/1857*

8/15/1857* d.

8/22/1857*

9/26/1857*

10/3/1857

10/10/1857*

11/21/1857

12/26/1857 d.

 

1/2/1858

5/8/1858*

5/12/1858*

5/15/1858

6/5/1858*

6/12/1858*

7/10/1858

8/7/1858*

9/18/1858*

9/25/1858

10/2/1858

10/9/1858

(continued)

10/16/1858

12/11/1858

 

1/29/1859

3/19/1859

6/23/1859

7/16/1859

8/13/1859

9/10/1859

10/1/1859

10/8/1859

10/22/1859

10/29/1859

11/5/1859

11/19/1859*

11/26/1859*

12/3/1859

12/14/1859

12/17/1859

12/21/1859

12/31/1859*

 

1/28/1860*

2/25/1860*

3/17/1860*

6/2/1860

8/25/1860

9/15/1860*

10/13/1860

11/10/1860*

11/17/1860*

12/1/1860*

12/26/1860

 

1/5/1861

1/12/1861 d.

1/19/1861*

1/30/1861*

2/16/1861*

2/23/1861*

3/2/1861*

3/6/1861

4/10/1861

4/13/1861*

5/4/1861*

5/25/1861

5/29/1861*

11/2/1861