GRISHAM-KELLOGG-FAUST FAMILY PAPERS

Mss. 5048

Inventory

Compiled by

Luana Henderson

Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections

Special Collections, Hill Memorial Library

Louisiana State University Libraries

Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University

2011

CONTENTS OF INVENTORY

SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................ 3
BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE .......................................................................... 4
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE ....................................................................................... 6
LIST OF SUBGROUPS, SERIES AND SUBSERIES ...................................................... 7
SUBGROUPS, SERIES AND SUBSERIES DESCRIPTIONS ......................................... 8
INDEX TERMS ................................................................................................................ 17
CONTAINER LIST .......................................................................................................... 19

Use of manuscript materials. If you wish to examine items in the manuscript group, please fill out a call slip specifying the materials you wish to see. Consult the Container List for location information needed on the call slip.

Photocopying. Should you wish to request photocopies, please consult a staff member. Do not remove items to be photocopied. The existing order and arrangement of unbound materials must be maintained. Reproductions must be made from surrogates (microfilm, digital scan, photocopy of original held by LSU Libraries), when available.

Publication. Readers assume full responsibility for compliance with laws regarding copyright, literary property rights, and libel.

Permission to examine archival materials does not constitute permission to publish. Any publication of such materials beyond the limits of fair use requires specific prior written permission. Requests for permission to publish should be addressed in writing to the Head, Public Services, Special Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803-3300. When permission to publish is granted, two copies of the publication will be requested for the LLMVC.

Proper acknowledgement of LLMVC materials must be made in any resulting writing or publications. The correct form of citation for this manuscript group is given on the summary page. Copies of scholarly publications based on research in the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections are welcomed.

SUMMARY

Size

8.5 linear ft.

Geographic Locations

Louisiana, Tennessee, California.

Inclusive Dates

[1807] ca. 1860-ca. 2009

Bulk Dates

1899-1976.

Languages

English.

Summary

Correspondence, photographs, financial papers, legal documents, printed items and ephemera reflect the social activities, family life and the genealogy of the Grisham-Kellogg-Faust family of Bolivar, Tenn. and Baton Rouge, New Orleans and Monroe, La..

Access Restrictions

Photographic negatives are restricted.

Reproduction Note

May be reproduced.

Organization

Papers are arranged chronologically within series and subseries, with the exception of picture postcards and photographs of identified African Americans, which are arranged alphabetically within the subseries.

Copyright

For those materials not in the public domain, copyright is retained by the descendants of the creators in accordance with U.S. Copyright law.

Related Collections

Walter Kellogg Lumber Company, Inc. Records, Mss. 2336.

Citation

Grisham-Kellogg-Faust Family Papers, Mss. 5048, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, La.

Stack Locations

U:321-329, OS:G, H:12, AA:, 65:

BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE

Isaac Marion Emerson (1847-1927), the son of John Emerson Asenath Stuart Emerson, was a native of North Carolina. He married Mary Anne Stone (1847-1924) of Madison County, Tenn., in 1867. The couple settled in Bolivar, Tenn., in 1872, where Emerson established himself as a planter and businessman. They had eight children, William, Daisy Asenath (married Orin Medicus Grisham), Robert Asa (married Mary G. Campbell), Sallie (married Edgar Galloway), Carrie Estelle (married Judge Robert Ward Oglesby), James, Mary Louise (married Charles Beams), Frank (married May John), and Margaret Ann (married LSU Professor Benjamin Henry Singletary).

Emerson’s daughter, Daisy (1873-1959), spent her childhood in Bolivar, and as a young woman she attended Peabody College in Nashville, Tenn. In 1898, she married Orin Medicus Grisham and lived in Nashville for a short time before moving to Winn Parish, La., in 1901. Daisy, as an adult, was a prominent member of the Monroe community. She was active in the First Baptist Church, the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Colonial Dames of America. She twice represented the DAR chapter as a delegate to the national convention in Washington, D.C. Daisy also was a lifetime member of the Monroe Garden Club.

Orin Medicus Grisham (1866-1944), a prominent Monroe, La., attorney, was the son of planter and merchant Pinkney Eugene Grisham (1843-1925) and Violater Smith Grisham of Gaars Mill and Dodson, La. Orin Grisham received his early education in the local country schools and went on to earn a teaching certificate from Mt. Lebanon College, now Louisiana College. After teaching school in Winn Parish for a short time, he received a scholarship to attend Peabody Normal College and University of Nashville, Tenn., where he graduated in 1892. Grisham later studied law at Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tenn. After graduation, he practiced law in Nashville for three years. While in Tennessee, he met and married Daisy Emerson, daughter of Isaac Marion Emerson. In 1901, they move to Winnfield, La., where he established the law firm of Grisham and Oglesby with Robert Wade Oglesby. Oglesby later became a local judge and married Daisy’s sister Carrie (1881-1943). Two years later, Orin Grisham served one term as district attorney of the 8th Judicial District Court. In 1916, he moved to Monroe and joined the firm of Stubbs, Theus, Grisham, and Thompson. In 1925, he and his partners established the law firm of Theus, Grisham, Davis, and Leigh. He remained with the firm until his death. Grisham was also a member of First Baptist Church and several fraternal organizations. Daisy and Orin Grisham had two daughters, Louise (1901-2002) and Marion (1899-1985). Orin’s sister, Mary Grisham, married Aurelius Smith, founder of Smith-Grisham Drug Co. in Winnfield, La.

Louise “Wese” Grisham graduated from Ward-Belmont College in Nashville, Tenn. She was a member of the Grace Episcopal Church in Monroe, La., where she served in the Daughters of the King and the Altar Guild. She was also a founding member of the

Junior Charity League. She held memberships in the Daughters of the American Revolution, the First Families of Mississippi, and the Colonial Dames of America. In 1922, Louise married Robert Long Kellogg, a native of Eau Claire, Wis.

Kellogg spent his youth in Rice Lake, Wis., where his father was engaged in the lumber trade. At the age of fifteen, he moved to Memphis, Tenn., where he continued working in the lumber business. He served in the 9th Battalion, 20th Engineers, Co. B, American Expeditionary Force in World War I, during which time he was stationed in France and assisted in French lumber production. After the war, he returned to Memphis; he relocated to Monroe, La., in 1921. In association with his brothers, he developed the Kellogg Lumber Co. of Monroe, La. He became a prominent figure in the lumber trade, serving as president of Kellogg Lumber Co. and president of the National Oak Flooring Manufacturers Association. He and Louise had two daughters, Mary Stuart and Rhoda Norman. Robert Kellogg died at the age of 37 on July 24, 1933.

In 1942, Louise married Thomas Watkins Leigh (1904-1983), a Monroe attorney and associate of her father. He joined the firm of Theus, Grisham & Davis as an associate in 1927, and became a partner of the firm in 1929, at which time the name was changed to Theus, Grisham, Davis & Leigh. Leigh, a native of Winn Parish, received a law degree from Louisiana State University, and began his law career in Monroe prior to World War II. During the war, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy. Kellogg was also active in local politics serving as a delegate to two Louisiana Constitutional Conventions, and as chair of the Louisiana Mineral Board and the LSU Board of Supervisors.

Mary Stuart ‘Dodo” Kellogg, daughter of Robert and Louise Grisham Kellogg was born in 1925. She attended Newcomb College in New Orleans; there she participated in several student organizations and activities. On Aug. 4, 1945, she married Dr. Richard Alan Faust, son of Edmond Lawrence Faust and Consuelo Abaunza Faust of New Orleans. Together they had four children, Richard (b. 1946), Rhoda (b. 1947), Robert (b. 1950) and Consuelo (b. 1953). The couple divorced in 1962. Three years later, Mary Stuart and her sister Rhoda Norman opened the Maple Street Book Shop in New Orleans, La., in 1965. The bookshop was later passed on to the daughter of Mary Stuart, Rhoda Faust. She sold the shop in 2007.

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

Papers are comprised primarily of personal correspondence and family photographs. They reflect the social activities, family life, and the genealogy of the Grisham-Kellogg-Faust family, and the related Emerson, Oglesby, Smith, Campbell and Stone families. Correspondence consists of family letters and picture postcards. Letters reflect the lifestyles of the correspondents, describing daily activities, health, social events, membership in church and hereditary and lineage organizations, and travel of five generations. Picture postcards depict buildings, landscapes, and sites of places visited on their travels. These include various locations in Louisiana, Mississippi, San Francisco and New York.

Other material in this collection includes personal papers, legal and financial papers, printed material, and ephemera. Personal papers consist mostly of genealogical material, but also include papers from World War I and II, as well as diaries, poems and notebooks. Legal and financial papers contain land conveyances, inventories of property, and certificates of marriage. Financial papers consist of receipts, invoices and statements reflecting personal expenditures for goods and services.

Published material contains serials, booklets and newspaper clippings. Clippings report on social events, professional activities and the deaths of family and friends. Additionally, there is a volume of the Various Speeches of Thomas W. Leigh (ca. 1973). Ephemera is comprised of printed items reflecting memorable events, which occurred over a number of years. These include funeral notices (1890-1927), wedding invitations, birth announcements, programs, and advertisements.

LIST OF SUBGROUPS, SERIES AND SUBSERIES

Subgroup 1. Papers, [1807] 1890-2009.

Series I.

Correspondence, 1890-1997, undated.

Subseries 1. Letters and notecards, 1890-1997, undated.

Subseries 2. Picture postcards, 1943-1982, undated.

Series II.

Personal papers, 1917-1986, undated.

Series III.

Legal and financial papers, [1807] 1905-1982, undated.

Series IV.

Printed items, 1890-2009, undated.

Subseries 1. Published material, ca. 1890-2009.

Subseries 2. Ephemera, 1890-2009, undated.

Subseries 3. Clippings, 1922-1992, undated.

Subgroup 2. Photographs, ca. 1860-ca. 2002, undated.

Series I.

Emerson-Grisham Photographs, ca. 1870-1976, undated.

Subseries 1. Emerson-Grisham Family Photographs, ca. 1870-1976, undated.

Subseries 2. Daisy Emerson Grisham Photographs, 1889-1958.

Series II.

Kellogg-Leigh-Faust Photographs, ca. 1860-ca. 2002, undated.

Subseries 1. Kellogg-Leigh-Faust Family Photographs, ca. 1860-1994, undated.

Subseries 2. Louise Kellogg Leigh Photographs, 1901-ca. 2002.

Subseries 3. Mary Stuart Kellogg Photographs, 1925-1976.

Series III.

African American Photographs, 1904-ca. 1983, undated.

SUBGROUPS, SERIES AND SUBSERIES DESCRIPTIONS

Subgroup 1. Family Papers, [1807] 1890-2009, undated.

Series I. Correspondence, 1890-1997, undated.

Subseries 1. Letters and greeting cards, 1890-1997, undated.

Correspondence comprises a large part of this collection, and is mostly personal in nature. Much of the correspondence, written from Monroe, New Orleans, and Baton Rouge, relates news of family and friends, as well as personal financial affairs. Letters reflect the lifestyles of the correspondents, describing daily activities, travel, social events, and health.

Early correspondence congratulates Orin M. Grisham on his academic achievements and contains letters of recommendation (1890-1892). The issue of divorce is addressed in a letter divulging the circumstances that led to the divorce of a cousin (Nov. 24, 1911).

In his World War I letters, Robert L. Kellogg describes his experiences while serving in the armed forces (1917-1919). He writes to his mother about his military duties at Camp Grant, Ill., (Oct. 7, 29, 1917) and his transport to France by ship. He describes logging in France and discusses the differences in the methods used there to those at home. Robert also describes the landscape of the countryside and the French people and sends news of relatives and friends who are serving in France. He remarks that the locals in a small French town entertained the Americans on Bastille Day (July 24, 1918). Robert tells of some soldiers’ release from quarantine (Dec. 1917), others put into quarantine for spinal meningitis (Jan. 11, 20, 1918), and of George Long, Jr. recently recovered from the flu (Feb. 27, 1919). He mentions having seen German prisoners, and comments on Kaiser Wilhelm II (Oct. 1, 1918) and Gen. Pershing (Mar. 7, 1919).

Correspondence received by Daisy Grisham (1923-1958) and written from Monroe, New Orleans, and Baton Rouge relates news of family and friends and includes many letters from her sister Margaret, who was married to LSU professor B.H. Singletary. In addition, these describe events at the university and in Baton Rouge. The letters of Louise and her friends at the early part of the 20th century reflect the lives of young adults at that time, relaying news of social activities, school, and her upcoming wedding (1920-1922). A letter from a Tulane University student describes medical school and the use of cadavers in his studies (May 12, 1921). Correspondence describes the theaters and the diversity of people in New York (Mar. 4, 1922), and Louise writes about her honeymoon trip to California (Jan. 1923). Lillian A. expresses her concern to O. M. Grisham regarding her mentally ill husband whom she was forced to commit to a mental institution (Oct. 15, 1923), and a series of letters relate to the spousal abuse of Mary Louise Emerson Beams by her husband, Charles Beams (June-Aug. 1926). Other letters concern the deaths of Stennis Oglesby (Jan. 1930), and Robert Kellogg (July-Aug. 1933), as well as the drowning death of Mary Anne Emerson (July 12, 1926).

In her correspondence, Mary Stuart Kellogg writes about her school and social life, camp activities at Lake Lure Camp, N. C. (July 1940), and her engagement and upcoming wedding (Nov. 1944-July 1945). Letters to her from other correspondents relate news of their personal activities, family matters, local gossip, and college life. They also discuss health, social events and the weather. Some of her correspondents are young men in school, in the military or friends she made while traveling (1938-1944). A letter from her childhood African American nurse, Awie, asks Mary Stuart to stay in touch after she goes off to school (Sept. 16, 1940). A letter from a friend attending the U.S. Military Academy at West Point describes his military training at Camp Clinton (July 6, 1940). In his letter, Orin M. Grisham, gives his granddaughter the status of a state legislative bill to exclude sororities from high schools (July 9, 1940). Daisy also receives requests for financial assistance and notes of gratitude from neighboring African American families (Nov, 24, 1940, Oct. 7, 1941, Dec. 31, 1958, undated).

Letters written during World War II comment on Adolph Hitler’s inability to launch an offensive in Russia and the bombing of German cities by the Allies (May 24, 1943). They also comment on a Japanese man from an internment camp helping with baggage (May 31, 1943), an American prisoner of war held by the Germans (Aug. 28, 1945), and the surrender of the Japanese (Aug. 13, 1945). Additionally, letters include a description of the landscape, architecture and the local population of Balboa, a town in the Panama Canal Zone (Dec. 22, 1942).

Travel letters describe the scenery and landscape along a bus route from New Orleans to New York (June 17, 1930), the garden plants at Rosedown Plantation near St. Francisville, La. (Mar. 26, 1931), and Managua, Nicaragua (Nov. 27, 1945). Margaret writes about her trip through the Blue Ridge Mountains (May 15, 1953); and in a letter to Daisy, a friend gives an account of her European tour, detailing the sights of London (Aug. 31, 1955). Louise and Tom write about their trip to Scotland and France by a steam liner (July-Aug. 1957). There are also references to a tea at the White House hosted by First Lady Mamie Eisenhower honoring the members of the DAR (Mar. 18, 1953, May 5, 15, 1953). A friend in London describes her social life there, writes about her trips to Australia, and comments on the politics of England and Australia (Sept. 1974-1976).

Letters relating to genealogy appear throughout the series, but the majority are written in the second half of the 20th century. They also reflect the family’s participation in the Daughters of the American Revolution, Colonial Dames, and similar groups. Letters record activities and trips taken by these groups over several years.

Correspondence pertaining to financial affairs relates to family-owned land in Tennessee, cotton production and the oil and gas industry. Many of Orin M. Grisham’s letters are business in nature, and concern the deposition of family land in Tennessee, which was owned jointly by Daisy and members of the Emerson family (Oct. 1926-June 1941). Daisy also writes to family members concerning this property (Oct. 9, 1927, Dec. 30, 1955, Jan. 1956). In addition, a series of letters discusses the lumber and oil industries (Dec. 4, 1929, 1932). Correspondents also address land use, farm management, crop

production, and the effect of weather on production (Sept. 12, 1923-1927, 1937, 1941-1945). Correspondents comment on land maintenance, African American labor (Mar. 15, 1923, June 9, 1923), and sharecroppers (Oct. 31, 1923).

General health issues are discussed throughout this series; however, several references are made to specific diseases in addition to those previously cited in the World War I letters (see above). These include comments on fifteen cases of diphtheria at Ward-Belmont College in Nashville (Feb. 1921) and an outbreak of polio in Bolivar, Tenn. (Aug.-Sept., 1945). In her letter reporting on the polio outbreak, Sallie remarks that all children under the age of sixteen were under quarantine, and she mentions two cases of polio among African Americans (Aug. 26, 1945). Frank writes that his children will not go to Bolivar because of the presence of polio (Sept. 14, 1945). Margaret mentions that her flu symptoms were treated with penicillin (May 15, 1953), and a letter to Tom Leigh informs him that several cases of fever forced a children’s summer camp to close early (July 22, 1957). Writing to Louise, Orin M. Grisham describes his stay at the Battle Creek Sanitarium at Battle Creek, Mich. (Aug. 25, 1938), and a letter to Margaret recounts the events leading up to the hospitalization of a relative for a psychiatric evaluation (Apr. 19, 1951).

Most letters relating to politics contain only passing comments on specific issues. In a letter to Orin M. Grisham, J. W. Hawthorn discusses the Louisiana gubernatorial candidates and their supporters (Jan. 5, 1919). Orin Grisham writes to Robert Kellogg concerning the animosity felt by the mayor of Monroe, Arnold Bernstein, towards Gov. Huey P. Long (July 10, 1932), and Kellogg writes to Bernstein about the economic concerns for local businesses (May 31, 1932). A letter to Daisy remarks on the effect the Supreme Court’s desegregation ruling will have on Virginia (Dec. 21, 1955), and Tom Leigh mentions his plan to run for Democratic delegate to the convention (Aug. 7, 1956). A letter expresses views on presidential candidates and national parties’ stance on civil rights (Oct. 30, 1956), while letters to Daisy remark on Gov. Earl K. Long’s political situation (July 2, 7, Aug. 25, 1959). John McKeithen invites Tom Leigh and Louise to the 1968 Sugar Bowl (Dec. 12, 1967), and letters to Louise Leigh from U.S. Senator John Stennis discuss a donation of books, education and her political support (1969-1970). Mary Stuart mentions her involvement with the Equal Rights Amendment (May 9, 1978).

Other letters mention various events such as a hurricane in New Orleans (Sept. 7, 1948), college girls attending a “Negro rock and roll” event (Dec. 19, 1951), and flooding and a steelworkers’ strike in Pennsylvania (Aug. 14, 1956). Additionally, Tom Leigh writes to General Middleton, President of LSU, to reiterate his position on the appointment of a dean to the Law School (July 23, 29, 1957).

Subseries 2. Picture postcards, 1943-1982, undated.

Family members and friends obtained these postcards while on their travels around the United States, Europe, Canada, and Central America. The majority of postcards depict historic buildings; however, others show landscapes and landmarks. They offer descriptions of locations and sites visited by family members and friends. Locations include sites in Louisiana and Mississippi.

Louisiana postcards depict the dining hall at the State Normal School in Natchitoches (1916), Pentagon Barracks dormitories at the LSU downtown Baton Rouge campus (pre 1926), and the LSU Catholic and Episcopal student centers (1946). New Orleans hotels and scenes show the Grunewald and Jung hotels, the Hotel Monteleone, and the home Gov. Claiborne (ca. 1920s-1940s). Plantations include Burnside Plantation at Donaldsonville, La., (ca. 1960s), Parlange Plantation house on False River and an unidentified plantation house in St. Martinville. Two additional postcards from St. Martinville show the historical Evangeline oak and the reputed grave of Evangeline (ca. 1897-1907). Other Louisiana sites include the Veterans Administration hospitals in Alexandria, New Orleans and Shreveport and the U. S. Post Office in Ruston (1913).

Mississippi postcards provide images of the Mississippi Gulf Coast and plantation houses in Natchez. Postcards from the Gulf Hills Dude Ranch and Country Club in Ocean Springs show the Faust children at play in a pool and one on horseback (ca. 1958-1964).

Notable are the depictions of "Aunt Shug" and "Uncle Melton" of Afton Villa Plantation, St. Francisville, La. (undated). Postcards from Mary Stuart in San Francisco, Calif., discuss family matters, her children and her participation in the National Organization of Women (1978-1985).

Note: Picture postcards are arranged alphabetically by location.

Series II. Personal papers, 1917-1986, undated.

Personal papers consist mostly of genealogical material, but also include papers from World War I and II, as well as diaries, poems and notebooks. Genealogical material is comprised of research notes, a short history of the Grisham family (undated), and biographical sketches of Daisy Emerson Grisham (Feb. 19, 1982) and Thomas Leigh (undated).

World War I papers are those of Robert L. Kellogg, consisting of a daily report (Mar. 25, 1918), a picture of Camp Grant, Ill. (1917), a receipt for military property (Jan. 7, 1919), and his diary (1918). The diary recounts his activities in camp prior to his deployment to France, including his confinement during quarantine (Jan.-Feb. 1918). The World War II papers are those of Thomas Leigh; they include a pilot logbook, student pilot certificates, and identification card (1940-1946). Also found in the collection are the employment records for Louise Kellogg Leigh, who was employed by the U.S. Dept. of the Navy (1943-1944).

This series includes the diary of Louise Kellogg (Jan.-Feb. 1925), Mary Stuart’s autograph book (1938), and academic certificates awarded by Ward-Belmont School (1921, 1941), as well as material relating to the weddings of Louise and Mary Stuart. They consist of a wedding booklet (1922), a wedding prayer book (July 7, 1942), a log of gifts (undated), and a notebook (ca. 1945). A memorandum book contains notes on appointments, meetings and social events (1986). There is also land tract T.20N R.15W in Caddo Parish, La. (1929) and a hand drawn land map of properties outside Bolivar, Tenn. (undated).

Series III. Legal and financial papers, [1807] 1905-1982, undated.

A typed transcription of a will, in which Joseph Brantley bequeaths his slaves, land and livestock to his heirs, is the earliest document [Mar. 27, 1807]. Land conveyances pertain to land sold to O. M. Grisham in Winn Parish (June 8, 1905, Aug. 9, 1906), an inventory shows the assets and yearly income of the estate of Orin M. Grisham (May 20, 1942), and a statement of account shows assets and expenditures (ca. Jan. 1948). Another statement shows the appraisement of property in the succession of Daisy Emerson (1959), and the property found in the “Museum House” (undated). An affidavit attests to the Union Parish residency of an African American, Will Clark, signed by Anna Lee Speed (June 18, 1948). Wills of Thomas Leigh (Nov. 19, 1981, Nov. 19, 1982) and Nathaniel Thornton (Jan. 27, 1970) are included, as well as a small notebook listing debts and assets of Emerson family members (1927-1931). This series also contains the marriage certificate of Louise and Robert Kellogg (Dec. 28, 1922), and the certificate of her later marriage to Thomas Leigh (July 7, 1942).

Financial papers consist of receipts, invoices and statements reflecting personal expenditures for goods and services (1923-1953, undated). Business financial papers include accounts for the Falcon Oil Co. (July 31, Dec. 1928), a typescript of an oil and gas lease certificate (Nov. 30, 1929), approval for the sale of timber authorized by the Federal Land Bank (Feb. 7, 1941), and price lists for products produced by various lumber companies (Oct.-Nov. 1924).

Series IV. Printed items, 1890-2009

Subseries 1. Published material, ca. 1890-2009.

Published material consists of serials, booklets and printed photograph albums. They relate to college students at Ward-Belmont College at Nashville, Tenn., and Tulane in New Orleans, La. (1942). They contain a directory/historian report produced by National Society of Colonial Dames in Louisiana (1963, 2009) and the 50th anniversary issue of Lagniappe, a publication of the Junior League of New Orleans (1955, 1974). Printed photo albums show buildings and scenes at Ward-Belmont College (ca. 1911) and Dunlap Springs near Bolivar, Tenn. (ca. 1890). Additionally, there is v. 1 of Various Speeches of Thomas W. Leigh (undated) in which Leigh speaks about the law to audiences at commencement ceremonies, bar associations meetings, and judicial courts. The Bancroft Banner celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Bancroft Paper Co. of Monroe, La., with pictures of employees at company events (1983). A short autobiography of R. W. Oglesby (ca. 1957), issues of the Roosevelt Review (May 1942, July 1946), and a program for the New Orleans Spring Festival (1949) are also found in this subseries. Of note is an article in defense of the Ku Klux Klan that appears in the Louisianian, a Franklin Parish journal (Dec. 15, 1921).

Subseries 2. Ephemera, 1890-2009, undated.

This subseries consists of printed items reflecting events occurring in the lives of family members and friends. They include funeral notices (1890-1927), wedding invitations, birth announcements, programs, and advertisements. A brochure describes the stained glass windows of Grace Church, Monroe, La., (undated), and another offers brief descriptions and pictures of plantation homes in the Natchez, Miss., vicinity (undated).

Also included are price lists of several lumber companies (1924) and an advertising handbill for Kellogg oak floors (undated). Other items include a brochure endorsing segregation (1967) and a speech presented by Louisiana Gov. Sam Jones at the Ward-Belmont College commencement ceremony. In this speech, he addresses the issue of women in American society (June 8, 1941). There is also an invitation to a Program and Tea organized by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Louisiana (May 2009). A photocopy of a broadside announces the sale of land involved in the suit of W. T. Emerson et al. vs. Sallie Galloway et al. in the Chancery Court (Nov. 20, 1930). In addition, ephemera contain a memorial for Orin M. Grisham (Sept. 18, 1944), memorial programs for Thomas Watkins Leigh (Sept. 6, 1983) and Helen Long (Mar. 5, 1977).

Subseries 3. Clippings, 1922-1992, undated.

Clippings report on social functions, the professional activities of Robert L. Kellogg, and the deaths of family members, including the drowning death of Mary Anne Emerson at the age of nineteen (July 12, 1926). They contain the obituaries of Emerson, Kellogg, Oglesby and Faust family members. Some obituaries offer short biographies of the deceased. There are also articles about the Baton Rouge and Caddo chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution (Nov. 19, 1936, Mar. 22, 1938, 1943-1944). Articles cover the weddings of Mary Louise Grisham to Robert Long Kellogg (Dec. 1922) and her daughter Mary Stuart Kellogg to Richard Alan Faust (May 1945).

Subgroup 2. Photographs, ca. 1860-ca. 2002, undated.

Series I. Emerson-Grisham Photographs, ca. 1875-1976, undated.

Subseries 1. Emerson-Grisham Family Photographs, ca. 1875-1976, undated.

This series reflects five generations of the Emerson-Grisham family and related Oglesby, Smith, Campbell and Stone families. The span of several decades also documents the aging of some family members. Photographs of John M. Emerson and Asenath Stuart Emerson (ca. 1875-1887), and Isaac Marion Emerson and Mary Ann Stone Emerson are among the earliest in this group. Included are portraits of Margaret Stone (ca. 1909) and Joyce Hunt (ca. 1911-1912), the two young daughters of Daisy and Orin Grisham, who died in early childhood. Another card photograph shows Isaac Emerson’s family home in Bolivar, Tenn. (ca. 1895-1905).

Additionally, there are card photographs of Pinkney Grisham and his wife, Violater Smith Grisham (ca. 1870-1880), as well as other members of the Smith family (undated). Oglesby photographs include Carrie Emerson Oglesby as a student, before her marriage (ca. 1898), her husband, Robert W. Oglesby (ca. 1919-1929), and their children including Jack Oglesby as an infant (1904), Jack with brother Stennis (ca. 1908) and Elizabeth “Woody” (ca. 1911-1912). A later portrait shows Jack Oglesby as a young man (ca. 1920-1929).

Snapshots show individuals and groups in outdoor settings or at social functions. The wedding day snapshots of Sallie Emerson and Edgar Galloway show the couple with

members of their wedding party and family members (1904). Photographs also offer the outside views of family residences in Bolivar, Tenn., and Winnfield, La. Among them are the homes of I. M. Emerson (ca. 1909, ca. 1950s) and Sallie Emerson Galloway in Bolivar Tenn. (ca. 1950s), and the homes Orin M. Grisham (1902, ca. 1909, ca. 1950s, 1976) and Judge Robert W. Oglesby in Winnfield, La., (undated). Early 20th century images show family members socializing in the yard outside Daisy Grisham’s home in Winnfield (ca. 1909). In addition, there is a tintype of Mary Grisham Smith, sister to Orin M. Grisham and her husband, Aurelius Smith (ca. 1860-1870), and another of a young woman (ca. 1890-1900). In addition, photographic postcards of Isaac and Mary Emerson and their home in Bolivar appear to be tintypes due to an uncommon developing process (ca. 1907-1917). Additionally, a montage of political figures bears an inscription to Tom Leigh from Gov. Jimmie Davis (ca. 1960-1964).

Subseries 2. Daisy Emerson Grisham Photographs, 1889-1958.

All the photographs in this subseries are of Daisy Emerson Grisham alone or with members of her family. They consist of card photographs, snapshots and copy prints. Cabinet cards show her at the age of sixteen (1889) and as a young woman prior to her marriage (ca. 1891-1895), and another shows her at the home of her parents in Bolivar (ca. 1898-1910). Snapshots represent Daisy at family gatherings and in outdoor settings (ca. 1915-ca. 1950). Photos of a trip to Mexico show Daisy posing with her sister, Carrie Emerson Oglesby, and her nephew, Jack, at unidentified locations (1941). Copy prints include tea parties hosted by Daisy for meetings of local members of the Daughters of the American Revolution (1950, 1954) and a large family dinner (1951). Additionally, there is a copy print of Daisy late in life (ca. 1957-1959). There is also a snapshot of Daisy with her four sisters (ca. 1920-1930).

Series II. Kellogg-Leigh-Faust Photographs, ca. 1860-ca. 2002, undated.

Subseries 1. Kellogg-Leigh-Faust Family Photographs, ca. 1860-1994, undated.

This subseries is comprised of card photographs, snapshots and copy prints. They include cabinet cards, studio portraits and family photos of the Kellogg, Leigh and Faust families. The earliest depict Jacob Faust and his wife, Frederika Schneider Faust (ca. 1860-1870) and a young Eva Long Kellogg, mother of Robert L. Kellogg (1864). Two snapshots show Eva later in life (ca. 1915-1920). Card photographs include a July 4th gathering (1899), and Robert Long Kellogg as a child (1899, ca. 1902) in Wisconsin and in his first law office (1926). World War I photographs show Robert Kellogg seated on a motorcycle in France and among a group of officers and civilians (ca. 1918-1919). There is also a portrait of Louise’s college friend, Gussie Ross portrait, (ca. 1920-1930). The influx of the floodwaters from the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 can be seen in the streets of Monroe (1927). Photographs specific to Richard Faust include students and football players at a Tulane game (ca. 1941-1945), a portrait of him in his football uniform (ca. 1941-1944) and a class photograph of the Tulane Medical School (1945). Other images include him during his military service at the Veterans Hospital in New Orleans (ca. 1948-1949), as well as several photos of the Kellogg, Faust, and various neighborhood children seated in a cart pulled by Beauty, the Kellogg’s pony, who died in Dec. 1953 (1938, 1941, 1953). Additionally, the Faust children are seen in a swimming pool at the Gulf Hills Dude Ranch and Country Club in Ocean Springs, Miss. (ca. 1958-

1964). This same image is found in picture postcard subseries. Among the several portraits and snapshots of Thomas Leigh is a photograph showing him with friends at the New Orleans Fair Grounds racetrack (ca. 1950-1959). A later image related to horseracing show the winning horse, Dadie, at the Jefferson Downs in New Orleans (1965).

This subseries also contains autographed photographs of Senator Russell Long (May 5, 1980), Gov. John McKeithen (undated), and an unsigned photo of Sam Jones (undated). Additionally, a group photo of the Louisiana State Mineral Board includes Thomas Leigh (Nov. 10, 1966). Photographs relating to Rhoda Faust and the Maple Street Book Shop in New Orleans show her in front of the shop (ca. 1978-1979), in the bookshop with her friend and author, Chris Wiltz (1994), and with her business partner Britton Trice and author Richard Ford (undated.)

Also found in this subseries are images of Parlange Plantation house in New Roads (ca. 1980-1985), and the home of Louise Kellogg Leigh in Monroe (1940, undated). Photographs relating to the City of Monroe include the Masur Museum of Art (1976), the museum of the National Society of Colonial Dames in Monroe (ca. 1976-1990), the law offices of Theus, Grisham, Davis and Leigh, and images of Layton Place. Two group photos show women dressed in the Acadian attire worn in the early 19th century.

Abaunza family photographs consist of a wedding party identified as “Violet’s wedding” (ca. 1920) and two copy prints of Gonzalo Abaunza portraits (undated), one taken as a young man, the other later in his life.

Subseries 2. Louise Kellogg Leigh Photographs, 1901-ca. 2002.

This group contains images of Louise Grisham Kellogg Leigh throughout her life. They consist of card photographs of her as an infant and young girl (1901, ca. 1907), loose pages of photo albums (ca. 1910, 1914, 1919-1923), and snapshots. The albums include notations identifying individuals. Louise is shown with schoolmates at Ward-Belmont College (1919-1920). The majority of the photographs, however, are snapshots of Louise with her daughters and family members. Snapshots also contain travel photos taken on a trip to South America with her daughters, Mary Stuart and Rhoda Kellogg. These photographs show them with fellow travelers on board the ship and sightseeing (1939). In a group photograph, Louise is seen at the New Orleans Fair Grounds racetrack with friends (ca. 1950-1959).

Note: Photographs of Louise Kellogg Leigh with her mother, Daisy Emerson Grisham, are found in Series I, subseries 2.

Subseries 3. Mary Stuart Kellogg Photographs, 1925-1976.

Photographs of Mary Stuart Kellogg consist of portraits, snapshots and copy prints beginning in her infancy and continuing into adulthood. Images reflect her social activities as a child, a young woman and later in life as an adult. They include a photograph with her father Robert L. Kellogg (ca. 1932-1938), two photographs with her younger sister, Rhoda at a Pass Christian resort (ca. 1930-1938), group photographs at the

Windy Wood Girls Camp (1935, 1938), and a group photo of her class at Ward-Belmont College (May 19, 1941). There is also an image of young Mary Stuart sitting in a boat during the 1927 Mississippi River Food. Photographs taken of Mary Stuart with her husband, Richard Faust, include their wedding (1945), and at the Blue Room and at the Fountain Lounge, in Roosevelt Hotel, New Orleans (ca. 1945). There are also family portraits and snapshots with her children (ca. 1946-1959). Notably, photographs include two images of Mary Stuart in her New Orleans bookshop, the Maple Street Book Shop (ca. 1968).

Note: Photographs of Mary Stuart with her grandmother, Daisy Emerson Grisham are found in Series I, subseries 2. Photographs with her mother Louise Kellogg Leigh are found in Series II, subseries 2.

Series III. African American Photographs, 1904-ca. 1983, undated.

Photographs of African Americans show them with of the Grisham, Kellogg, Leigh, and Faust families at the homes of Daisy Grisham, Louise Kellogg Leigh, and at the law office of Tom Leigh (1975). Identified individuals are the domestics employed by the families. They include the families’ maids, gardeners and nursemaids, as well as food servers hired for special events. Among them is Mary “Awie” Coleman, nursemaid to Mary Stuart (1927-1962, undated), Carrie Grayson photographed with Faust family members (1953-1958, undated), Carrie Thornton (1976), Earl Frost (1975-1976, 1995), Horace Kelly (1953, undated), and Betty Paulin (ca. 1970-1980). There are also snapshots of men with livestock and a father in a small boat with his children, possibly taken during a flood (1922). Notably, a small card photograph shows an unidentified family prepared to set out for Colorado in a horse drawn wagon. Their African American cook (1904) accompanies them. There is also a photograph of Joyce Grisham, infant daughter of Daisy Emerson Grisham, in the arms of her “Mammy,” Aunt Ann (1911).

Note: Identified individuals are arranged alphabetically followed by unidentified individuals, which are arranged chronologically.

INDEX TERMS

Terms

Subgroups. Series. Subseries

African American household employees--Louisiana.

1.I.1; 2.III

Battle Creek Sanitarium.

1.I.1

Bolivar (Tenn.)--Social life and customs--20th century.

1.I.1-2, IV.1; 2.I.1-2

Daughters of the American Revolution.

1.I.1, IV.2; 2.I.2

Eisenhower, Mamie Doud, 1896-1979.

1.I.1

Emerson family.

1.I.1, II; 2.I, III

Faust family.

1.IV.2; 2.II.1, 3, III

Floods--Mississippi River Valley-Photographs.

2.II.1, 3, III

Great Britain--Social life and customs--20th century.

1.I.1

Grisham, Daisy Emerson, 1873-1959.

1.I.1, II, III; 2.I.2

Gresham family.

1.I

Grisham, Orin Medicus, 1866-1944.

1.I.1, II, III, IV.3; 2.I.1-2

Gulf Coast (Miss.)--Description and travel.

1.I.2; 2.II.1, 3

Influenza.

1.I.1, II

Jones, Sam H. (Sam Houston), 1897-1978.

2.I.1

Kellogg, Mary Stuart, b. 1925.

1.I.1, II, IV.2; 2.I.2, II.2-3

Kellogg, Robert Long, 1896-1933.

1.I.1, II, III, IV.2

Leigh, Louise Grisham Kellogg, 1901-2002

1.I.1, II, IV.2;

Leigh, Thomas Watkins, 1904-1983.

1.I.1, II, III, IV.1, 3

London (England)--Social life and customs--20th century.

1.I.1

Long, Earl Kemp, 1895-1960.

1.I.1

Long, Russell B.

2.I.1

Louisiana--Politics and government--20th century.

1.I.1; 2.II.1

Louisiana--Social life and customs--20th century.

1.I.1; 2.I-III

Maple Street Book Shop (New Orleans, La.)

2.II.1, 3

McKeithen, John J. (John Julian), 1918-

2.I.1

Natchez (Miss.)--Buildings, structures, etc.

1.I.2

National Society of Colonial Dames of America.

1.I.1, IV.1, 3; 2.II.1

New Orleans (La.)--Buildings, structures, etc.

1.I.2

Ogilvie family.

1.I.1, IV.1, 3; 2.I.1-2

Parlange Plantation (La.)

2.II.1

Petroleum industry and trade.

1.I.1, III

Plantations--Louisiana.

1.I.1-2, IV.3

Plantations--Mississippi--Natchez.

1.I.2, IV.3

Poliomyelitis--Tennessee--Bolivar.

1.I.1

Rosedown Plantation (La.)

1.I.1

Slavery--Louisiana.

1.III

Tulane University--Students.

1.IV.1; 2.II.1

Ward-Belmont College (Nashville, Tenn.)--Students.

1.I.1, II, IV.1; 2.II. 2-3

World War, 1914-1918.

1.I.1; 2.II.1

World War, 1914-1918--France--Personal narratives, American.

1.I.1

World War, 1939-1945.

1.I.1; 2.II.1

CONTAINER LIST

Stack

Location

Box

Folders

Contents

Subgroup 1. Papers, [1807] 1890-1997, undated.

U:321

U:322

OS:G

U:323

1

2

3

1-92

1-83

1

1-16

Series I. Correspondence, 1890-1997, undated.

Subseries 1. Letters and notecards, 1890-1944

Letters and notecards, 1845-1997, undated.

Letters, Oct. 16, 1957, undated.

Subseries 2. Picture postcards, 1943-1982, undated.

U:323

OS:G

3

17-36

1

Series II. Personal papers, 1917-1986, undated.

Poem, undated; land tract, 1929; map of properties outside Bolivar, Tenn., undated.

U:323

3

17-45

Series III. Legal and financial papers, [1807] 1905-1982, undated.

U:323

H:12

U:324

OS:G

U:324

OS:G

3

4

4

46-55

v. 1

1-12

1

13-17

1

Series IV. Printed items, 1890-2009, undated.

Subseries 1. Published material, ca. 1890-2009.

Various Speeches of Thomas W. Leigh, 1973.

Subseries 2. Ephemera, 1890-2009, undated.

Broadside, 1930; Kellogg advertisement, undated.

Subseries 3. Clippings, 1922-1992, undated.

1920, 1941-1976 undated.

Subgroup 2. Photographs, ca. 1860-ca. 2002, undated.

Series I. Emerson-Grisham Photographs, ca. 1870-1976, undated.

U:324

U:325

5

6

7

8

9

10

1-15

1-14

1-10

1-11

1-7

1-6

Subseries 1. Emerson-Grisham Family Photographs, ca. 1870-1895.

ca. 1897-1904.

ca. 1905-1909.

ca. 1910-1919.

ca. 1920-1940.

1942-1976, undated.

65:

10b

1

Tintypes, 1860-1870, 1890-1900.

Negatives (access restricted).

U:326

11

1-12

Subseries 2. Daisy Emerson Grisham Photographs, 1889-1958.

Series II. Kellogg-Leigh-Faust Photographs, ca. 1860-ca. 2002, undated.

U:326

U:329

OS:G

AA:

65:

12

13

14

1-7

1-11

1-8

20

1

1

1

Subseries 1. Kellogg-Leigh-Faust Family Photographs, ca. ca. 1860-1920.

1921-1959.

1960-1994, undated.

Gussie Ross portrait, ca. 1920-1930; Thomas L. Leigh, ca. 1941-1944; Faust family portrait, ca. 1964; Russell Long, 1980; 4th Judicial Bar Assn., 1974.

Montage of political figures, ca. 1960-1964.

CD-ROM: Scans of the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927.

Negatives (access restricted).

U:327

15

16

17

1-6

1-12

1-6

Subseries 2. Louise Kellogg Leigh Photographs, 1901-ca. 2002.

1901-ca. 1919.

ca. 1920-ca. 2002.

Photograph album pages, ca. 1910, 1914, 1919-1923.

U:328

U:329

18

1-12

20

Subseries 3. Mary Stuart Kellogg Photographs, 1925-1976.

Wedding portrait, 1945.

U:328

19

1-15

Series III. African American Photographs, 1904-ca. 1983, undated.